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3 Journals for Finding your Way in a Complex World

We know from research that journaling has the biggest impact on our health when it helps us to better understand and integrate our experiences. Experienced people who journal may be able to do this with a blank page, but for those who get lost when confronted by the vastness of a page full of emptiness, we have three journals that are interactive and aim to unlock the hidden places inside of us.

Meera Lee Patel, a self-taught artist designed a beautiful journal that creates inspiration and space for the writer to self-reflect. With brilliant colors, favorite quotes, and questions with space to respond, Made out of Stars: a Journal for Self-Realization could easily become a favorite first or last stop in the day. Patel covers the big topics- fear and despair, loneliness and happiness- with equal aplomb. Her watercolor artwork has just the right touch, and each page is an invitation to find more joy and compassion. “Like stars,” Patel writes, “we are each held together by our own indescribable forces: tiny beacons of light that flow within us, making us who we are.”

Keiko Agena, author of No Mistakes: A Perfect Workbook or Imperfect artists, found her way to embracing imperfection on the improv stage. She insists that we all have an artistic side, and that however you express it is perfect – even in its’ imperfection. “Your ragged edges are what make you great,” she writes, “stop smoothing them out. Your odd point of view, your imperfections, these are your treasures.” Her book encourages readers to go on a journey to discover, accept and express your voice through prompts and art, sometimes intricate, and sometimes simple lines on a page.

More and more people these days are experiencing high levels of anxiety, likely due to the constant influx of bad news. For them, Lori Deschene’s Tiny Buddha’s Worry Journal: A Creative way to Let go of Anxiety and find Peace is a place to go and explore ways to find the calm in each moment. She offers quotes, suggestions, and prompts designed to help the reader create a “calm kit” and explore letting go of feeling responsible to manage every detail of their experience – especially those things they have no control over. She offers, “Instead of worrying about all the scary things that are going on in the world, I will do my part, however small, to make the world a better place by…”

We learn through exploration. Rather than feeling frozen by fear, anxiety, and confusion, consider exploring these places inside of you through journaling. You may find that you are able to create your own road map to freedom.